Tags filed under ‘standards’

adamnorwood.com

adamnorwood.com 2009

Freshened up my personal blog and portfolio site for 2009. While similar to the transitional look and content that you’ve seen for the past couple of years, this theme has been hand re-written from scratch and features many advancements over the old style. The entire site is better integrated through WordPress than ever before using features newly available in WP 2.7.1 (gravatars, per-post styles, threaded comments, etc), a handful of customized plugins, subtle jQuery enhancements, and Subversion to tie it all together on the backend. I’ve also moved to a new domain after about ten years of being at asnorwood.com. All of the old links should still point to the right place (or get you pretty close), but let me know if you find something missing.

The bulk of the improvements are behind-the-scenes, but I can at least say that the following changes make my life easier and me happier:

  • Uploading new portfolio work is much more straightforward.
    No more need for a separate gallery plugin!
  • The category and link organization is more sensible! Tags, too!
  • Better error-handling — hopefully you won’t end up 404 Not Found, but you at
    least have a sporting chance of getting unstuck now!
  • The search engine optimization (I hate that term) seems to be working
    already, too. Thanks, Google!
  • The search form pulls up better, more accurate results!

All of this tech stuff is secondary, of course, and I’m still trying to decide how best to balance the blog entries between my different interests. Maybe I’ll eventually split off into two or more distinct sites to keep things from rambling together. I’d also like to figure out a better way to incorporate the side-channel links (currently I’m using del.icio.us) and scrap-collecting elements (I love Tumblr for gathering quotes and other detritus, but not sure how best to tie that content in with my main site). Being nearly the fifteenth anniversary of my first website, you’d think I’d have this all figured out by now!

What do you think? What would you change?

IE8′s Faustian Bargain

Faust IE7

“If the swift moment I entreat:
Tarry a while! You are so fair!
Then forge the shackles to my feet,
Then I will gladly perish there!
Then let them toll the passing-bell,
Then of your servitude be free,
The clock may stop, its hands fall still,
And time be over then for me!”
 — “Faust,” Norton Critical Edition, lines 1699 – 1706

The above lines are from Goethe’s story about the scholar Dr. Faust and his famous bargain. The scholar promises his soul to the devil in exchange for earthly knowledge and power, on the condition that his life will be forfeit only when he experiences a moment that he wishes would persist. What does this have to do with Internet Explorer 8? It’s a tortured and overblown metaphor to be sure, but for some reason this week’s developments in the world of web development reminded me of this fable.

If you haven’t already, start off with this article from A List Apart and perhaps move along to Eric Meyer’s analysis of the news. These articles appeared almost simultaneously with a post on the IEBlog about the scheme. To grossly summarize, the IE team has worked out a deal with some of the major players in the web standards scene and representatives of the browser makers to introduce a new <meta> tag allowing developers to target specific browser implementations. They argue that this move will help prevent complaints of new browser versions “breaking the web” when they are released to the public.

This news seems to have come as quite a surprise, with heated discussion (mostly negative as far as I can tell, and at times sadly mean-spirited) breaking out in the usual forums. Molly Holzschlag provides the most level-headed analysis I’ve read so far, and alludes to the secretive, NDA-protected discussions that led up to this decision. Even Ars Technica and El Reg have weighed in on the issue.

The contemptible part of the new specification is that it’s designed to allow sites to lock into a current implementation, and Microsoft has made the decision that the default rendering engine for pages lacking this meta tag will be IE7 (not IE8, the browser that’s introducing this feature, or the more sensible default of “latest version”!). The implications of this are that future versions of IE (and other major browsers?) will contain emulation code allowing it to switch back to a previous engine at will so that sites will always look and act the same as the designer intended, quirks and all. If you have IE10 and look at a page lacking the proper meta tag, it will use IE7 to display the page. I guess that means IE8 won’t pass the Acid2 test by default? What does that even mean?

In my humble, semi-educated opinion, this could be a major setback to the web standards movement and to the speedier development of better web technologies (and things already move at a glacial pace in the web world). We’ve been taught for years that the road to enlightenment was paved with progressive enhancement and future-proofing, and this goes against that grain. I find the idea disquieting too for its other more pragmatic implications — how will this actually be implementable? I was relieved to find in a post by Robert O’Callahan, a coder who works on Firefox, that he was puzzled by many of the same questions I was having. Won’t this increase dramatically the footprint of each successive browser release? And I’ve used emulators of all kinds in the past, and they simply aren’t perfect.

Will this end web development as we know it, or kill the open standards movement? No, of course not. But it’s confusing enough and sudden enough that it’s not surprising that more than a few people are upset by the news. Maybe I’ll warm up to it when I hear more specifics about how this will actually work in the real world, but for now I’m highly skeptical.

Update: The debate continues, with two further articles from A List Apart. The first, “They Shoot Browsers, Don’t They?” by Jeremy Keith makes the case that a good beta version of IE8 would go along way towards making the case for one side of the other, depending on how its display holds up on the current web. I’d have to agree, and I’m glad to see ALA giving a contrary opinion some space, after the articles from last month caused such an uproar. Having said that, Zeldman’s “Version Targeting: Threat or Menace?” fans the flames a bit as he tries to make his case again in favor of the default opt-in method. This time it’s revealed that major DOM scripting changes are the root cause of Microsoft’s concern, which I don’t think was mentioned previously. The argument doesn’t seem to stick, at least based on the response the article’s drawn. I still stand by my view that this is a pretty bad deal, and one that’s only intended to help Microsoft’s short-term financial interests. Check out the commentary on these two articles, though, for a handful or other good opinions. Even though there doesn’t seem to be much traction, public discourse is always welcome.